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20110301
20110331
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KQED (PBS) 42
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 115 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the people at toyota, all across america. chevron. we may have more in common than you think. and by bnsf railway. and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the libyan rebels' drive to oust moammar qaddafi reached the outskirts of his hometown and tribal base today. fighting erupted outside the city of sirte, home to 100,000 people. it's a key stronghold guarding the approaches to tripoli, 225 miles away. the rebels had already rolled up a series of eastern cities in a lightning advance over the weekend, behind a curtain of coalition air strikes. we have a report from outside sirte from lindsey hilsum of independent television news. >> reporter: they're fighting just east of sirte, colonel qaddafi's birth place. the rebels who swept up the road yesterday found hi
at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a lot of money. >> where does it go? >> every penny and more went into bringing energy to the world. >> the economy is tough right now, everywhere. >> we pumped $21 million into local economies, into small businesses, communities, equipment, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >and by the bill and menda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the international campaign of air strikes extended deep into libya today. french warplanes claimed a kill in the no-fly zone. they also raided far south of tripoli to disrupt the flow of mercenaries to the government side. elsewhere, rebels reported gains in the embattled port of misrata killing 30 government sniper
, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. pacific life. and by bnsf railway. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: japan suffered two major blows today, as a desperate effort continued to head off a nuclear crisis on the heels of a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami. a new explosion rocked a shut- down reactor at a plant that lost its cooling system in friday's disaster. and the u.n. nuclear agency warned a second reactor was failing as well. thousands of people had already been ordered out of a 12-mile exclusion zone around the plant. today, another 140,000 people living 12 to 20 miles away were told to stay indoors, and officials imposed a no-fly zone around the site. we have a series of reports from independent telev
and traditional society. >> suarez: this country has the highest fertility rate in latin america. it's a distinction it would like to shed. we'll take a look at how. >> brown: judy woodruff examines what a cap on debit card fees would mean for consumers, banks, and retailers. >> ifill: and david brooks explores our inner lives in his new book, "the social animal." >> we're really good at talking about material things. really bad at talking about emotions, really good at stuff we can count. really bad at the deeper stuff that actually drives behavior. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> you can't manufacture pride, but p
't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. pacific life and by bnsf railway. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: more and more refugees crowded libya's borders with tunisia and egypt today. the u.n. estimated that 140,000 people-- most of them foreigners-- have fled the violence inside libya. and tunisian guards at a main crossing point fired into the air at times today, as they strained to maintain order. we have a report on the tunisian border from alex thomson of independent television news. >> reporter: desperate to get into tunisia and for some the wait is too much. manhandled over the frontier walls into the hands of the medics. on the wall they kick them, they hit them, but still plenty get throu
look at today's house hearings on terrorism and islamic radicals in america. margaret warner talks with congressmen keith ellison and michael mccaul. >> woodruff: "frontline's" martin smith has an exclusive interview with brian manning, father of accused wikileaks source private bradley manning on his son's imprisonment. >> his clothing is being taken away from-- he's being humiliated by having to stand at attention in front of people-- male, or female, as far as i know, you know, that are fully clothed. >> lehrer: and republican congresswoman kay granger discusses cuts in foreign aid. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. >> oil companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a lot of money. >> where does it go? >> every penny and more went into bringing energy to the world. >> the economy is tough right now, everywhere. >> we pumped $21 million into local economies, into small busi
in the people at toyota, all across america. pacific life. bnsf railway. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the rebel drive across northern libya turned into a panicked pullback today. moammar qaddafi's forces laid down a barrage of heavy weapons fire on the approaches to sirte, qaddafi's home town. the outgunned rebels were forced to flee the way they'd come. we have a report from lindsey hilsum of independent television news at the front lines. >> reporter: the rebels were gathering when the bad news started to come back down the road. just after dawn, those approaching sirte had been attacked by armed civilians loyal to colonel qaddafi. >> they started to shoot at us from houses and trees. it was an ambush. they were qaddafi's and mercenaries from africa. they had t
u.s. and south america. newshour correspondent spencer michels reports from san francisco. >> reporter: civil defense sirens blared across hawaii, 3,800 miles from japan, as the warnings came hours before the first waves hit. >> we have water and stuff at home already. we just need gas. charging up our phones and everything. better be safe than sorry. we just pray for the best, though, hope everything works out for everyone. >> reporter: most heeded the appeals to move away from coastal areas, escaping seven- foot waves that swamped beaches. as the day wore on, there was some flooding, but only minor damage and no injuries. it all came just a year after the chilean earthquake triggered similar alerts. >> i think that, because of the last tsunami situation that hawaii had, that we have some practice. so i really felt like people knew what to do. everyone had a very good response, i think, just because they've had practice and they realize how important it is. >> reporter: several hours later, the waves, moving 500 miles an hour, struck north america. in another stroke of go
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 115 (some duplicates have been removed)